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Innovations in scholarly communication [clear filter]
Sunday, April 17
 

9:00am

Bringing open annotation to all scholarly works (morning session of all-day workshop)
Limited Capacity seats available

This is the morning session for an all-day workshop, organized by Hypothes.is, a non-profit whose mission is to enable a conversation over the world’s knowledge.

Agenda and details: https://www.force11.org/group/annotating-all-knowledge-working-group/aak-coalition-face-face-meeting-bringing-open

At the first Beyond the PDF conference, the goals were lofty and the aims clear: “to move us beyond a static and disparate data and knowledge representation”. With open, web-based annotation a reality, the time and technology is ripe to realize this vision. This workshop will bring together key players in the scholarly communications ecosystem to explore the feasibility and desirability for equipping all books, articles and other digital media, new and old, with the capability for readers to create, share, and discover annotations from colleagues, authors, friends and experts around the globe. This technology should be open source, federated, and based on standards. The goal: to bring open annotation to all scholarly works within 5 years.

The workshop will feature presentations, discussions and demonstrations covering current progress, opportunities and barriers to bringing a pervasive, open annotation layer to all scholarly work. We will consider how open annotation fits into the larger idea of the 21st century Scholarly Commons, through linking of annotations to systems like ORCIDs. Outcomes will be to forge relationships and outline next steps towards achieving the goal.

Speakers
DW

Dan Whaley

Hypothes.is


Sunday April 17, 2016 9:00am - 12:00pm
Room 3A001 (180 seats) OHSU Collaborative Life Sciences Building

9:00am

Workshop on Semantic Publishing
Limited Capacity filling up

9:00-9:15 Introduction (Michel Dumontier)

9:15-9:45  Francesco Osborne - Two roads to Semantic Publishing

9:45-10:15 Alex Garcia - A Semantic Print for Experimental Protocols

10:15-10:45 coffee break

10:45-11:15 Anita Bandrowski - Semantic publishing based in scientific ground truth; the RRID use case.

11:15-11:45  Peter Murray-Rust - Semantifying Scholarly publications using ContentMine and Wikidata

11:45-12:15 Panel discussion on the challenges and future of Semantic Publishing (moderated by Michel Dumontier)

12:15-12:30 Wrap up session (Michel Dumontier)



Semantic publishing is "anything that enhances the meaning of a published journal article, facilitates its automated discovery, enables its linking to semantically related articles, provides access to data within the article in actionable form, or facilitates integration of data between papers" [Shotton 2009]. Stronger notions of semantic publishing envisage that the main scientific claims are formally represented and published as entities in their own right. In this workshop we will discuss how to advance practice with respect to these ideals in the age of Big Data and Data Science.

Anticipated outcomes of the workshop include:
  • Learn about the state of the art in semantic publishing
  • Critically evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of semantic annotation versus genuine semantic publishing
  • Assess the role of scientific data with respect to the research article
  • Discuss the sociotechnological challenges faced by semantic publishing
  • Bring academic and commercial interests together
  • Build social networks and identify opportunities for collaboration.
  • Participate in the development of a white paper on semantic publishing

Speakers
MD

Michel Dumontier

Stanford University
TK

Tobias Kuhn

VU University Amsterdam



Sunday April 17, 2016 9:00am - 12:30pm
Room 1S008 (25 seats) OHSU Collaborative Life Sciences Building

1:00pm

Bringing open annotation to all scholarly works (afternoon session of all-day workshop)
Limited Capacity seats available

This is the afternoon session for an all-day workshop, organized by Hypothes.is, a non-profit whose mission is to enable a conversation over the world’s knowledge.

Agenda and details: https://www.force11.org/group/annotating-all-knowledge-working-group/aak-coalition-face-face-meeting-bringing-open

At the first Beyond the PDF conference, the goals were lofty and the aims clear: “to move us beyond a static and disparate data and knowledge representation”. With open, web-based annotation a reality, the time and technology is ripe to realize this vision. This workshop will bring together key players in the scholarly communications ecosystem to explore the feasibility and desirability for equipping all books, articles and other digital media, new and old, with the capability for readers to create, share, and discover annotations from colleagues, authors, friends and experts around the globe. This technology should be open source, federated, and based on standards. The goal: to bring open annotation to all scholarly works within 5 years.

The workshop will feature presentations, discussions and demonstrations covering current progress, opportunities and barriers to bringing a pervasive, open annotation layer to all scholarly work. We will consider how open annotation fits into the larger idea of the 21st century Scholarly Commons, through linking of annotations to systems like ORCIDs. Outcomes will be to forge relationships and outline next steps towards achieving the goal.

Speakers
DW

Dan Whaley

Hypothes.is


Sunday April 17, 2016 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 3A001 (180 seats) OHSU Collaborative Life Sciences Building

1:30pm

Defining the Scholarly Commons
Limited Capacity seats available

The digital age is seeing an informal convergence within the scholarly communication space: the Natural and Health Sciences, the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, applied and professional fields are all discovering that they have more in common when it comes to the future of research communication than differences. What is needed now is a program that will help us realize the potential of this merger: the development of a “Scholarly Commons.”

The Scholarly Commons is not a single platform or tool, but rather the principles, best practices, interfaces and standards that should govern the multidirectional flow of scholarly objects through all phases of the research process from conception to dissemination.

FORCE11 has launched a program designed to define and incubate the idea of the Commons. We are conducting a series of workshops and exercises to examine the best thinking around the world about what is required for a scholarly communications ecosystem designed for 21st century scholarship.

This workshop will provide an overview of the program, disseminate results to date for feedback and provide a forum for discussion and community engagement around this important topic.

Speakers
avatar for Robin Champieux

Robin Champieux

Librarian, Oregon Health & Science University
I am the Research Engagement & Open Science Librarian at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland Oregon. In that capacity, I work to understand the everyday practices and goals of biomedical researchers and students in order to advance the uptake of open scientific workflows... Read More →


Sunday April 17, 2016 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 3A002 (180 seats) OHSU Collaborative Life Sciences Building

1:30pm

Open peer review workshop
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Agenda and Background Materials: http://bit.ly/force2016peerreview

Open peer review: will it last or not, and how safe is it?

Peer review as we understand it and apply it as researchers relates to the appraisal of submissions to journals, funders or conferences, in order to trigger funding or publishing decisions. Traditionally, for publications, this was done in almost complete secrecy between the author (s), editor (s) and reviewers.

The literature on the subject is full of cases of excesses and biases that have made the process a subject of contention and problems. Experimentation around open peer review, both pre- and post-publication, has gained momentum in recent years (e.g. F 1000, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, PubPeer, RIO Journal) and is introducing a sense of equity and transparency into a process that was not known for it.

Though the experiences are still recent and need time to be assessed, the effects of this unbridled openness are largely unexplored.

In this workshop, we propose to discuss and investigate these questions about the future of peer review in an a world dominated by Internet and its proclivity to openness.

Speakers
avatar for Samir Hachani

Samir Hachani

Lecturer, Algiers University, Algeria
I'm a teacher at the school of Library and information science .My main interests are open access, open peer review and digital divide. In the workshop I'm organizing with Neil and Daniel , we will try to see what is the future of peer review in light of the numerous opportunities... Read More →
avatar for Neil P. Chue Hong

Neil P. Chue Hong

Director, Software Sustainability Institute & Senior Research Fellow, EPCC, Software Sustainability Institute / University of Edinburgh
Software sustainability, research software engineering, and software metrics.
avatar for Daniel Mietchen

Daniel Mietchen

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, Data Science Institute, University of Virginia
- Integrating research workflows with the Web - Engaging the research community and the public with open research workflows - Using open research workflows in educational contexts


Sunday April 17, 2016 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 1S006 (16 seats) OHSU Collaborative Life Sciences Building